Alec

We discussed the dyadic nature of our project and explored our interest in what these dyads evoke.

What do I want for my other in the group?

Is what I want in line with what he/she wants?

Even if what I want for the other is in sync with what they want for themselves how does my wanting it change change things in some way?

How can I be more of what I want for the other?  (is some of my wanting for the other a projection of what I want/ need for myself?)

How does my wanting for the other impact him/her?

Does my advocacy and support inspire?  Does my advocacy and support entrap?

How does my care taking reinforce the role of the other as one needing care?  the disabled?

What is the oppressive side of care taking?

What does the disabled/cared for one want to be called?

How does being a caretaker effect one’s sense of self?  (how am I not me because of Bernardo’s needs)

How have the boundaries blurred between caring and oppressing?

Including the others:

How can we include the voice of the caretakers of individuals with more severe disability?

How do we discuss and express the continuum measuring stick that compares disability with disability and fosters envy, pain and exclusion of some kind?

How do we judge other caretakers?

How am I like the mother who killed her disabled daughter?

How am I like the mother who refuses to see disability in her child? (the rose colored glasses)

Is everybody on the same page and “in the know” about what this project is about?

Can we all be on the same page?

Is it necessary for us to be on the same page?

Can we share a stage without all sharing the same goal and understanding of the project?

We all have the dream of a community in which everyone is fully accepted for and what they contribute.  BUT we also struggle with this.  The caretakers seem to struggle with goals and aspirations regarding the contributions of their partner.

What does the let’s sing about fishing moment teach us about relating with others without judgment or expectation?

Why is it easy for Ethan, Henry and Delia to offer this unbiased listening and relating and harder for the rest of us?

How can we understand this outside of our tendency to interpret it and label it as a property of disability?

How will we each sing the same song with the same arrangement differently?

Cecilia

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Hi all,

Thank you, Cecilia, for the thorough notes. I have a few follow up questions:

1. What is the role of music in the final project? Will it be underscoring? Will there be set musical numbers to be sung/performed?

2. Can we write a song with the same lyrics and arrangement, but mean something new with each character that performs it?

I am referring to certain shows such as Gypsy and Sister Act that has examples of this:

In Gypsy, “Let Me Entertain You” is used twice. We were introduced to this song when the young daughters were singing this song, performing on the vaudeville circuit. The last time we hear the song again is when Louise grows up and sings it while performing a striptease .

In Sister Act the musical, “Take Me to Heaven” was first sung by Deloris about her boyfriend, and then sung again by nuns about Jesus/God.

Would the concept of a song like this tie both the caretakers and the cared together? Can a song like this

illuminate how alike yet different we are? Can a song like this shed light on the nuances of being human?

Ming

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Ming, and everyone,

As if right now, sixty pages into the play, there is one song.

In the context of the play, Ethan’s character is composing it for Henry’s character.

Him noodling on the guitar and writing it is used as underscoring and transition music in one scene, which then culminates in him singing it to his mother (Maria’s character).

I intend to bring this song back at the end. Where everyone can join in or something.

The song in my head is a mix between the song Ethan wrote and shared for us and something new that’s more universal.

In the context of the play, he’s writing it for Henry’s character to celebrate his moving into his own place, gaining independence, and moving forward.

These are universal themes of the play.

I love the idea of having this piece written by the group or something. And Ming, your idea to make it mean different things in different contexts is spot on.

As for other musical things: there is hard core punk rock that should be like the Sex Pistols played loud for transitions. Would love some gentle piano for transitions as well. And…the sounds of the city. Trains, sirens and such.

That’s what I got so far.

You’ll have a draft by Friday!!!

Alec

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I’m at an autism conference today at UJA Ronald  Suskind presented on his book Life Animated. And I’ve been thinking about Ming’s questions and wondering if in the performance of the play we might have breaks to have singalongs. I don’t think we would get into any ASCAP issues if we ask the audience for a  favorite Disney song
and the singalong is conducted by a music therapist. We embed the music therapy into the process and product.

What do u think?

Maria

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It’s a tricky thing. I’m up for trying anything, but I do believe that the play requires momentum and breaks like that will not only take the audience out of the emotional wave of the play, but the performers too.

I think as people are sitting, like before the play has begun, or when the play ends (or both) could be appropriate times for that, but it’s my opinion, and like I said I’m up for trying anything, that breaking up the play like that runs the risk of losing people.

But let’s try it, won’t say a hard no till I see it!  And if everyone likes it, let’s fricken do it!

Ming

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Of course Alec. And your aesthetic concern is valid ,yes. Music before and after,too also possible. Everything will flow from the play, the holy text. That is central.

Maria

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